With the rampant occurrence of both natural and man-made disasters all over the world, it is equally important for everyone to be fully prepared when it strikes. While it’s right to stock your basic supplies like food, water and whatnot, don’t forget to arm your smartphone during these situations. There are several apps that you can download for free that is designed to help people in times of emergencies.

First Aid (American Red Cross)

 

The First Aid – American Red Cross app contains basic first aid lessons covering a variety of topics, complete with videos and diagrams. For emergency situations, the app provides easy-to-follow step-by-step instructions to administering first aid. In addition, it includes an integrated 911 button, allowing you to call emergency services from within the app.

The app also includes safety tips on a wide variety of situations, from severe winter weather to hurricanes. There are also interactive quizzes that help keep your lifesaving knowledge up to date. The app is ad-free, available in Spanish and does not require an Internet connection.

Pet First Aid (American Red Cross)

 

In a disaster situation it can be easy to overlook the well-being of our four-legged friends. The Pet First Aid app from the American Red Cross is very similar to its human counterpart. There are easy-to-understand instructions to help guide you through veterinary emergencies, including size-specific CPR techniques. The app also features advice and tips on a range of topics including stress management and more. In addition, you can store your veterinarian’s contact number and provide locations to the nearest vet hospital.

Disaster Alert

 

Do you live in an area prone to the wrath of Mother Nature? Whether it is severe weather or man-made emergencies, give Disaster Alert a look. The app features an interactive map that lists active hazards around the globe. The app compiles information on a wide variety of incidents from authoritative sources worldwide. These incidents are “designated hazardous to people, property or assets.” Disaster Alert issues automatic updates every five minutes on everything from wildfires to tsunamis to volcanoes. In addition, users can view additional information that can be shared with others directly from the app.

American Red Cross Wildfires, Tornado, Hurricane & Earthquake

 

The American Red Cross has four apps specifically tailored to some of the most common natural disasters affecting Americans today:

The app supplies users with up-to-date notifications concerning the developments of these emergencies. In addition, the apps are chock-full of advice and tips that can help you navigate these disasters safely. Like the other American Red Cross apps, these are available in Spanish.

Medical ID

 

Medical ID allows users to create a customized medical profile that is displayed on your device’s lock screen. In the event of an emergency, first responders can quickly access vital, life-saving information. You can include information like your blood type, any allergies you may have, emergency contacts, medications you take and more. If you are incapacitated during an emergency situation, Medical ID can provide medical staff with the essential information they need to take action.

FEMA

The official app of the Federal Emergency Management Agency is loaded with useful information. The app includes a database of tips for what to do before, during and after over twenty types of disasters. Furthermore, it can point you in the direction of disaster recovery centers and open shelters.

 

In addition to potentially life-saving information, the FEMA app also features a number of handy tools. You can create a list of items in your emergency kit, as well as a list of family meeting places. Finally, the app includes a featured called “Disaster Reporter.” This allows you to share your disaster photos with emergency personnel to assist in rescue efforts.

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This entry was posted by Staff Writer on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 6:23:27 AM and is filed under Tech Tips & Tricks.

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